For Those New to Bodywork

 

As a starting place, most people are familiar with the term ‘massage.’  Massage generally refers to the hands-on working of the soft tissue of the body to support the health and vitality of the recipient.  It uses various techniques such a Swedish, which is your basic relaxation massage, to deep tissue, which is used for pain relief.

 

In the last two decades massage has grown enormously in recognition and popularity.  Professional massage has dropped connotations of sexuality and has become publicly accepted as a vital healthcare service.  And research shows massage is highly medically effective.  Massage today stands as a pillar of alternative health and natural healing methods.  Indeed for thousands of years, massage was a critical part of healthcare.  Today in the West it is finally returning to its rightful place.

 

The Health-Creating Value of Massage 

Consider that most disease is the result of external stress weakening the natural systems of the body.  This makes the body vulnerable to imbalance and to sickness.  So what are the best resources to combat this stress?  If I made a list, massage would be number one.  Receive one good massage and you will feel its incredible impact on your stress level. This potent ability to alleviate stress makes massage one of the best healing modalities we have.  Investing in good touch is truly investing in your life.

 

You can experience less stress through bodywork.  Book a session and see for yourself. 

 

 

‘Massage’ vs. ‘Bodywork’

So what about ‘bodywork?’ How is that different than massage?  To me, ‘bodywork’ is a broadening of all that massage represents.  Think of touch that goes beyond basic Swedish massage — the form that everyone recognizes.  Instead, imagine touch that works with the organs, or the cerebrospinal fluid system, or the nerves, or movement patterns, or the complex relationships between emotion, trauma and the physical body.  When we imagine this kind of touch, bodywork becomes a term that opens us up to all that hands-on work can be.  

 

‘Touch therapy’ is another term used to give the sense of going beyond massage.  It leads us to think of hands-on work as a comprehensive practice that supports health and healing of the whole person.  It acknowledges the use of touch as complete therapeutic vehicle.

 

 All of this leads us to my sense of bodywork as a tool for liberation.